Enough is enough. You’ve seen them all over, disturbing your peace and coming back no matter how many you get rid of. Somewhere in the back of your mind, you must understand what’s going on – You’ve got a big problem, you’re dealing with an infestation. By now, you’ve probably passed through the aisle a dozen times. Big cans with pictures of dead bugs on them, all sorts of sprays. Then, the bomb. They’ll always tell you that they eliminate the entire population of bugs, but is that true? Do bug bombs work? For that matter, what are bug bombs? This article will cover everything you need to know about pest foggers, bug bombs – Whatever companies want to call them!

What is a Bug Bomb? What is a Fogger?

First and foremost, though “bug bomb” is more commonly used among consumers, they are actually called total release foggers, a form of pesticide that releases the full contents of its container as a part of its function. This means that bug bombs and foggers are the same things. The idea behind these devices is that they saturate a room or part of the home with pesticide or repellent so that nothing can escape from it. This is why you’re advised to leave the area for up to four hours while the pesticides take care of your pest problem. The process resembles professional fumigation, especially if the room or rooms are sealed during the time the device is in operation. In theory, this is a sound means for dealing with pests.

Are Bug Bombs Effective?

This is where the problem starts. Many pests, such as ants and roaches, form colonies where the majority of the animals are in a single space where they rest, eat, and reproduce. This colony will stake out an area around the colony as their foraging grounds, and it may make sense to set a bomb in this area and let the chemicals do the work while you’re off at the day job. In reality, while a bug bomb may kill several insects, it will not get all of them.

The most likely outcome is that the colony is broken up. Even bugs are smart enough to know when something is killing them, and they’ll flee when that happens. Worse is that the survivors of the original colony – And there will be survivors if you use a bug bomb, lots of them! – Will then start their own colonies. In a couple of weeks to a month, you’ve got an even bigger mess on your hands than before. One colony can quickly become ten!

The Verdict

If you’re going to use a bug bomb, use it safely. Don’t use it in a room with exposed food or where pet or baby toys are present. However, are bug bombs effective? Many bug bombs are simple deterrents or repellent sprays, which are even worse than the products that kill bugs as these only relocate the insects. Bug bombs are not an effective long-term solution. If you have a problem area of the home where insects are reproducing and causing problems, leave the chemical decisions to the professionals and let them determine the best solution for your problem.

Chances are, it won’t be a bug bomb. Save your money!